Second Lap at the National Press Building

In 1985, the year of Reagan and Gorbachev, “Back to the Future,” Bo Jackson, and TWA Flight 847, I snagged a job that brought me to DC as Correspondent for the Tampa Tribune. Our middle daughter, who many years later would design this website, was two weeks old. We arrived in town and I planted my little flag on the 12th floor of the National Press Building.

Twenty-five years later, years packed with learning, teaching, parenting, success, failure and everything in between, we returned to the Press Building, took the elevator one flight past my old stomping ground, and launched “Bella.”

Please check out the video from this amazing night by clicking the link below.

National Press Club Launch

3 Comments so far »

  1. Larry Lipman said,

    Wrote on December 19, 2010 @ 9:24 pm

    A lot of novels are set in and around the Washington DC area, but it’s obvious the writer was just passing through. I’m about half way through the book and I’m enjoying not only the plot but Washington as subtext. Steve portrays it the way it really is.

    It was good to have Steve back at the National Press Club. At its heart, this book is about a Washington correspondent and that is why the press club began–as a place for Washington correspondents.

    I can’t wait to read what happens next in this book.

    Larry Lipman
    Former President, The National Press Club

    [Reply]

    stevepiacente Reply:

    Thanks for weighing in, Larry. Technology has changed things a bit since you and I were covering Paula Hawkins and Bob Graham, but the essence of good reporting remains the same. That includes adhering to a code of ethics that Danny, the reporter in Bella, puts aside as he pursues both the story and the widow. It costs him, to say the least …

    [Reply]

  2. Lauren Markoe said,

    Wrote on December 31, 2010 @ 12:03 pm

    I fear for traditional reporting and traditional reporters, because I don’t think democracy works without them. Bella reminds us of the way good reporters work and think, and how fun and frustrating it can be to make a living in the news.

    [Reply]

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